TU Delft Reduces Meat Meals by 25%

May 9th, 2011


Project Helder (or “Project Clarity”, in English) is a Dutch consultant group that specializes in going green. “Our mission is to make sustainability feasibility for companies… for most companies sustainability is not exclusively a social topic, but also an important, strategic choice for a healthy future.” Project Helder helps worksites and schools make more eco-friendly choices with the workshops, products and outlines that large institutions need to implement lasting change. They believe that no step is too small and hope to make “the world more durable inch by inch”.

As part of their efforts, Project Helder is working to bring Meatless Monday to institutions throughout the Netherlands. The group acknowledges that Meatless Monday is a fantastic way for worksites and schools to “reach a number of environmental standards with one action”. According to Project Helder’s website, a day without meat saves as much carbon emissions as not driving for an entire week. They also note that production of one kilo (or 2.2 pounds) of beefsteak uses as much water as 1,300 showers!

On March 7th, Project Helder introduced Meatless Monday at the Delft University of Technology. The group shared the campaign with students and faculty by placing posters throughout the school’s cafeteria, including labels next to meatless dishes that explained their health and environmental benefits. Since the launch, Project Helder has been happy to report that Monday meat consumption at TU Delft is down an impressive 25%! They have found that once patrons are informed of the benefits of cutting back, they are generally positive about the campaign and willing to give more meatless options a try.

We at Meatless Monday would like to congratulate TU Delft and Project Helder on this fantastic initiative! We will continue to keep you updated as we hear more Meatless Monday news from the Netherlands and the other 17 countries around the globe that have taken on the campaign as a way to support personal and planetary health.