Barley Fried Rice


This healthy spin on fried rice features the nutritious whole grain barley in place usual white rice. Edamame adds protein to the dish while eggs, peas and carrots take up their traditional role in this popular dish. This recipe comes to us from Amber of Homemade Nutrition.

Serves 4 – 6

  • 1 teaspoon unsalted butter
  • 2 large eggs, cracked and mixed in a small bowl
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil or light olive oil, separated
  • 1/2 medium red onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 cup frozen edamame (shelled)
  • 1 cup frozen peas and carrots
  • 3 1/2 cups cooked barley (or brown rice)
  • 1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • red pepper flakes to taste (optional)
  • chopped cilantro for garnish (optional)

Heat a large cast iron or nonstick skillet over medium low heat. Melt the butter, and cook the eggs until they are scrambled and just barely cooked through. Remove the eggs from the skillet and set aside.

Turn the heat up to medium high, add 1 teaspoon of the oil, then add the onion, garlic, salt and pepper. Cook for about 5 minutes or until the onion begins to soften. Add the edamame and peas and carrots and cook for about 2 more minutes.

Add the remaining 2 teaspoons of oil, then add the barley. Stir the mixture, then let it sit for about 1 minutes, then stir again and let it sit for another minute (this is to allow the barley to brown). Repeat 2-3 more times.

Finally, add the soy sauce, sesame oil, red pepper flakes (if using) and cooked egg and mix to combine everything. Remove from heat. Top with chopped cilantro for garnish.

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Barley Fried Rice

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