Carrot Beet Soup


Carrot-Beet-Soup

Beets and carrots are slow roasted and seasoned with garlic, balsamic vinegar and cayenne pepper sauce. Fresh Mexican cheese and fresh cilantro add salty and herbal notes to deepen the flavors of this satisfying soup. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings.

Serves 2

  • 12 ounces baby carrots
  • 4 medium beets, peeled and diced 1/4 inch
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 cups low sodium vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper sauce
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • queso fresco, crumbled, for garnish
  • cilantro, chopped, for garnish

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Toss the carrots and beets with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Spread out onto a baking sheet, transfer to the oven and roast for 40-50 minutes, or until the veggies are tender when pierced with a fork.

Place the remaining tablespoon of olive oil into a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion to the pan and sauté for about 2-3 minutes, or until the onion begins to become soft. Add the garlic and sauté for one minute more, or until the garlic becomes fragrant.

Add the roasted beets, carrots and vegetable stock to the saucepan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until lightly thickened. Stir in the vinegar and hot sauce. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Transfer the beet stock mixture to a blender or blend in the pot using an immersion blender. Blend until very smooth, adding water to taste if you prefer a thinner soup.

Divide into 2 bowls, top with queso fresco and chopped cilantro and enjoy!

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Nutrition Information

Carrot Beet Soup

Servings per Recipe: 2

Amount per Serving

Calories:  236

Calories from Fat:  125

Total Fat:  14g

Saturated Fat:  2g

Cholesterol:  0mg

Sodium:  274mg

Carbohydrates:  26g

Dietary Fiber:  7g

Protein:  3g

Sugars:  17g

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