Hearty Italian Minestrone


The cannellini beans give this traditional Italian soup fiber and protein. An easy weeknight dinner that makes great leftovers, this hearty soup is a great way to eat your vegetables on a cold winter night. This recipe comes to us from Kristie Middleton‘s book, MeatLess: Transform the Way You Eat and Live—One Meal at a Time, courtesy of De Capo Press.

Serves 4 to 6

  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 1 medium zucchini, chopped
  • 5 cups low sodium vegetable broth
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1 cup alphabet, macaroni, or other pasta
  • 1/2 bunch kale, torn into bite-size pieces
  • 1 15-ounce can cannellini beans, rinsed, and drained
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or 1/2 teaspoon dried
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried
  • Chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsleyfor garnish

In a large stockpot, saute onion in olive oil on medium heat until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook for another minute.

Add tomatoes, carrots, zucchini, broth, salt, and pepper. Bring to boil. Add pasta and cook for 7 to 9 minutes until al dente. Stir in kale, beans, tomato paste, thyme, and basil. Simmer for 5 minutes more.

Garnish with more chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsley.

PRO-TIP: Ladle soup into individual containers, allow to cool, seal containers, and freeze for up to three months for easy work lunches or quick homemade dinners!

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Nutrition Information

Hearty Italian Minestrone

Servings per Recipe: 4

Amount per Serving

Calories:  362

Calories from Fat:  63g

Total Fat:  7g

Saturated Fat:  1g

Cholesterol:  0mg

Sodium:  1014mg

Potassium:  1094mg

Carbohydrates:  61g

Dietary Fiber:  13g

Protein:  13g

Sugars:  9g

Vitamin A:  188%

Vitamin C:  99%

Calcium:  17%

Iron:  18%

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